Home Gardening Calendar

Monthly Garden Calendar

The Right Thing at The Right Time Assures Garden Success

Gardending Calendar for the Victoria Texas Area

A gardener should consider starting a personal garden notebook based on his or her own garden. In the garage or work room, post a calendar with dates marked for fertilizing, planting, spraying, etc.

Click the Month you want to read more information on.

GENERAL: Make needed changes in landscape design. Fill low places and correct poor drainage. Dispose of dead plants which may harbor diseases. Start preparing beds for a spring vegetable garden. Start planning spring flower and vegetable plantings. Study seed catalogs and start ordering seed, if unavailable locally.

PRUNE: Cold hardy plants only. Trim overgrown hardy shrubs, trees, vines. Prune fruit trees such as apple, peach and pear; remove suckers, thin tops, and cut back to keep low. Prune pecan trees. Prune grape vines. Crape myrtle can be pruned to increase summer bloom. Do not prune cold-damaged plants or stimulate them to grow because a freeze may damage new growth. Frozen, soft plant material can be removed. If in doubt, do not prune, NEVER TOP TREES.

PLANT: Evergreens, dormant vines, shrubs, trees, roses, onion sets, hardly seedlings, and bulbs such as dahlia tubers, pre-chilled freesia, rain lily and gladiolus. Ideal time to plant bare-root trees and shrubs. Hardy container plants can be set out. Do not plant palms or tender plants.

SEED TO PLANT OUTDOORS: Flowers such as alyssum, baby’s breath, bedding begonia, calendula, candytuft, carnation, cornflower, daisy (African and Shasta), dianthus, forget-me-not, hollyhock, larkspur, nasturtium, petunia, annual phlox, strawflower, sweet William, and verbena. Vegetables, including asparagus, beets, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, collards, dill, endive, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, mustard, parsley, parsnip, garden peas, radish, spinach, Swiss chard, and turnip.

SEED TO PLANT IN FLATS: Tender flowers and vegetables, including tomato, aster, coreopsis, dahlia, gerbera, gaillardia, lobelia, impatiens, mealy blue sage, rose mallow, scarlet sage, torenia, vinca.

FERTILIZE AND MULCH: Add organic matter (peat moss, compost, manure, etc.) to newly made beds. Feed pansies, sweet peas, and calendula. Fertilize citrus, grapes, palms, and mature peach trees. Apply superphosphate to daylilies. Feed spring-flowering bulbs (except amaryllis) after small plants form. Treat hydrangeas with aluminum sulfate for a blue color.

PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL: Spray dormant plants subject to attack by scale with winter strength oil emulsion: repeat spray in 10 days. If iris leaves have black spots, spray with fungicide or dust with sulphur.

WEATHER PROTECTION: Winter is usually a dry period, so occasional supplemental water may be needed. When a freeze is predicted, protect tender plants. Remove covers as soon as freeze ends. Cardboard boxes, plastic trash cans, plastic sheet and adequate support are best covers. Make sure plants are watered before a dry “norther.”

POSSIBLE BLOOM: Flowers including alyssum, bedding begonia, calendula, candytuft, daffodil, dianthus, gerbera, daisy, kalanchoe, pansy, marigold, petunia, annual phlox, scarlet, sage, snapdragon, sweet pea. Trees and shrubs such as camellia, flowering pear, loquat, flowering quince, poinsettia, roses, winter jasmine. Berries of Burford holly, nandina, and pyracantha; fruit of citrus.

POSSIBLE HARVEST: Beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, citrus fruit, collards, endive, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, mustard, onion, parsley, parsnip, peas, radish, spinach, Swiss chard, turnip.

GENERAL: Seed catalogs can inspire as you plan the spring campaign. Locally spring usually starts in late bloom after June. Cut back chrysanthemums; the cuttings may be rooted. Divide chrysanthemum plants, replanting the new growth and discarding old stem. Prepare soil for flower and vegetable beds, if not done earlier. If needed, dethatch lawns.

PRUNE: Prune dormant, cold hardy trees, vines, and shrubs except those which bloom in spring or early summer; wait to prune these until after they bloom. Prune most roses except for some climbers and shrub roses. Prune grabs and figs if not done earlier. If freeze-damaged plants are pruned, be careful not to cut into healthy wood, which might stimulate premature growth. In late February, cut excess heavy oleander canes off at ground. Do not prune palms yet.

PLANT: Last chance to plant bare-rooted plants. Continue planting cold hardy dormant trees, shrubs, and vines, including roses. Also plant crinum, dahlia, gerbera, gladiolus, montbretia, rain lily, Shasta and Michaelmas daises, spider lily, potato, onion sets (for green onions), and cuttings of oleander and other hardy woody shrubs and vines. Seedlings of tender plants (including tomato) may be set out in late February but must be protected from late freezes. In late February plant tender Dutch amaryllis. Wait to plant tropical plants and palms.

SEED TO PLANT: Flowers including alyssum, African daisy, baby’s breath, candytuft, carnation, cornflower, early cosmos, daisy, globe amaranth, lobelia, marigold, phlox, pinks, salvia, strawflower, tithonia. Vegetables, including asparagus, beans, beets, broccoli, carrots, collards, dill, kale, lettuce, mustard, parsley, radish, New Zealand spinach, Swiss chard, and turnip. At the end of the month, start plantings of spring vegetables, such as pumpkin, squash, tomato, and watermelon; is there is a late freeze, protect these or replant.

FERTILIZE: All hardy plants except recently planted trees and roses with a complete fertilizer. Established trees and lawns may be fertilized either in February or March. Wait to feed tropical plants until danger of freeze is past. After pruning, feed established roses monthly with high phosphorous fertilizer through September. Fertilize pecan trees. Feed spring-flowering bulbs (except amaryllis) as young plants emerge. Use acid-reacting fertilizer on azalea, gardenia, magnolia, Louisiana iris, etc.

DISEASE AND PEST CONTROL: To control scale, apply dormant oil spray on trees with no leaves; summer oil can be used on citrus when temperatures are above 40 degrees F. Establish a weekly spray schedule for roses late in the month. Spray aphids on daylilies with soapy water. Gardenia and camellia may be sprayed with summer weight emulsfiable oil to control scale when temperature is above 40 degrees F.

WEATHER PROTECTION: Keep freeze protection devices handy for another month to use if needed. Water moderately if weather is dry.

POSSIBLE BLOOM: Annuals, perennials, and bulbs including alyssum, anemone, begonia, calendula, daffodil, freesia, geranium, gerbera daisy, kalanchoe, nasturtium, pansy, paperwhite narcissus, petunia, pinks, salvia, snap and vines such as azalea, Carolina Jessamine, camellia, flowering quince, huisache, Indian hawthorn, poinsettia, primrose jasmine, redbud.

GENERAL: Improve your soil. Mix organic matter with soil to improve texture and beneficial organism content. Gather mulch to apply to planting beds next month. Soil test sample may be taken for analysis. In first half of month, remove any dead grass and lawn weeds; cut lawn fairly short; fertilize and water. Sprig in plugs to cover bare patches. In late March divide and replant crowded liriope, monkey grass, many other ground covers. Start air layers or take root cuttings off many wood trees, shrubs, and vines. Tender container plants can be moved outdoors in late March.

PRUNE: Prune out freeze-damaged wood and remove obviously dead plants toward the end of the month. Shade trees can be pruned. Palms can be pruned at month’s end. After March 15, cut back poinsettias to 12 inches high; cuttings can be rooted. Thin excess peaches. Root prune bougainvillea which failed to bloom last year.

PLANT: Most vines, shrubs, and trees, including citrus. Most tropical plants can be set out after mid month. Do not plant palms yet. Plant late spring and summer blooming bulbs such as agapanthus, amaryllis, caladium, crinum, dahlia, gladiolus, spider lily, tuberose. Plant daylilies and, after freeze danger is past, plant geraniums.

SEED TO PLANT: Flowers including ageratum, alyssum, amaranthus, African daisy, baby’s breath, balsam, castor bean, cleome spinosa, cockscomb, coleus, cosmos, gazania, gerbera daisy, globe amaranth, lobelia, marigold, mealy blue sage, morning glory, morning start creeper, moss rose, nicotiana, rose mallow, scarlet sage, sunflower, strawflower, tithonia, torenia, verbena, vinca, and zinnia. Vegetables including asparagus, beans, beets, broccoli, cantaloupe, corn, cucumber, eggplant, okra, field peas, pepper, pumpkin, radish, squash, tomato, turnip, and watermelon. Plant onions (for greens) and potatoes.

DIVISIONS AND CUTTINGS: Divide and replant chrysanthemums. Make layers, air layers, or root cuttings of bougainvillea, hibiscus, oleander, and other shrubs and trees. Poinsettia cuttings can be taken this month or next.

FERTILIZE: If not done last month, fertilize trees (especially magnolia), lawns, and daylilies. Fertilize azaleas and camellias monthly for 3 months after they bloom. Use an acid-reacting fertilizer on magnolia, azalea, camellia, poinsettia. Give monthly feeding to hibiscus and roses. After danger of frost is past, feed tropical plants with balanced fertilizer.

DISEASE AND PEST CONTROL: Watch for aphid, caterpillars, white fly, mildew, and other fungi. Check daylilies for aphids. Use appropriate sprays or dust.

WEATHER PROTECTION: A late freeze is possible until mid month or later. Mulch to prepare for hot, dry weather. If rainfall is inadequate, water.

POSSIBLE BLOOM: Bulbs such as amaryllis, anemone, calla lily, canna, daffodil, Dutch iris, freesia, hyacinth, oxalis, ranunculus, tulip, and snowflake. A multitude of annuals and pereannials including ageratum, alyssum, baby’s breath, bedding begonia, bells-of-Ireland, bluebonnet, calendula, candytuft, cornflower, geranium, gerbera, impatiens. Johnny-jump-up, kalanchoe, larkspur, nasturtium, flowering kale, pansy, petunia, pinks, phlox, poppy, snapdragon, strawflower, stock, sweet pea, violet. Many flowering trees, shrubs, and vines including agarita, azalea, bottlebrush, bridal wreath, camellia, cherry laurel, daisy bush, guava, honeysuckle, huisache, Italian jasmine, Carolina Jessamine, lantana, Indian hawthorn, huisache, ligustrum, orchid tree, pittosporum, primrose jasmine, quince, redbud, roses, shrimp plant, spiraea, Texas mountain laurel, Turk’s cap, viburnum, wedelia, wisteria, yucca. After a mild winter, tropical plants such as bougainvillea, bird of paradise, hibiscus, and oleander. Berries of duranta, nandina, and pyracantha.

POSSIBLE HARVEST: Asparagus, beets, broccoli, all members of the cabbage clan, carrots, citrus, endive, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, loquat, onion, parsley, parsnip, garden peas, radishes, spinach, Swiss chard, and turnips.

GENERAL: Divide and replant ground covers. Do not remove leaves of bulbous plants until they yellow; instead camouflage by planting annuals nearby. Divide and replant canna, lirope, monkey grass, etc. Mulch azaleas, camellias, roses. Start air layers of crotons, hibiscus, etc.

PRUNE: Spring flowering trees (including ornamental pear and redbud), shrubs, and climbing roses after they bloom. Shape azaleas if needed. May prune palms now. If not done earlier, cut poinsettias back to 12 inches high and fertilize. Thin grape clusters as needed.

PLANT: Container-grown plants at any time and barerooted plants if well cared for. May plant palms and other tropicals. Plant bulbs of caladium, elephant ear and crinum. Set out plants of begonia, daylily, geranium, and many others. Divide and set out chrysanthemum plants if not done earlier.

SEED TO PLANT: Flowers including ageratum, alyssum, amarantus, baby’s breath, balsam, castor bean, cleome, cockscomb, coleus, cosmos, dusty miller, globe amaranth, gourd, marigold, moonflower, morning glory, morning star creeper, moss rose, portulaca, strawflower, sunflower, tithonia, torenia, verbena, vinca zinnia. Vegetables such as asparagus, beans, cantaloupe, corn, cucumber, okra, field peas, peppers, pumpkin, squash, watermelon.

FERTILIZE: Fertilize spring flowering trees, shrubs, and bulbs (including amaryllis) when they finish blooming. Feed ground covers, evergreen shrubs, and vines grown for foliage. Give monthly feeding to hibiscus, azaleas, camellias, and roses. Fertilize bougainvillea and geranium. Feed tomatoes as soon as they start to set fruit. Side dress other vegetables as needed. Feed pecans. Feed tropical plants as needed.

PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL: Use appropriate materials to control mildew, rust, and black spot on roses. Watch for spider mites on a wide range of house plants, outdoor ornamentals, and vegetables. Watch for whitefly on gardenia, citrus, yew, and other evergreens. Aphids, chinch bugs, thrips, webworms, and other caterpillars are often troublesome. Call county extension agent for spray date for pecan nut casebearers (late April-May). Spray pecan trees with foliar zinc regularly April through August.

WEATHER PROTECTION: Mulch all cultivated areas, especially those containing azaleas, camellias, chrysanthemums, gardenias, hydrangeas, and roses. Water deeply as needed. Give wind protection to small trees and recent transplants of flowers and vegetables.

POSSIBLE BLOOM: Most spring-flowering annuals and perennials listed in March, plus African daisy, agapanthus, calla, cleome, cornflower, crinum, daisy bush, daylily, Easter lily, gaillardia, geranium, gladiolus, globe amaranth, Louisiana iris, marigold, moss rose, morning star creeper, mealy blue sage, oxalis, scarlet sage, spuria iris, blue plumbago, bottlebrush, cenzio, Confederate jasmine, honeysuckle, hibiscus, lantana, ligustrum, magnolia, oleander, orchid tree, pomegranate, roses, spiraea, wild olive, and yucca. Many tropical plants especially those sheltered in winter.

POSSIBLE HARVEST: Asparagus, beans, beet, broccoli, cabbage, carrot, collards, cucumber, endive, kale, kohlrabi, lettuice, loquat, mustard, onion, garden peas, parsley, parsnip, earliest peaches, radish, spinach, squash, Swiss chard, turnip, onion.

GENERAL: Set up a drip irrigation system for vegetables and flowers. Clean, repair, and replace garden tools; label with your name and phone number. Root cuttings of croton and other shrubs.

PRUNE: Shrubs, palms, and climbing roses after they have bloomed. Annuals such as verbena which are beginning to look “seedy” may be cut back to encourage new bloom. Prune and fertilize blackberries after harvest. In late May cut poinsettia back to two feet from ground and feed.

PLANT: Palms and container-grown shrubs, trees, and vines. Also plant tropical plants, caladium, tubers.

SEED TO PLANT: Flowers such as ageratum, alyssum, amaranthus, balsam, cockscomb, coleus, cosmos, four ‘o clock, globe amaranth, marigold, morning glory, morning star, moss rose, sunflower, tithonia, torenia, verbena, vinca, and zinnia. Vegetables including okra and field peas.

FERTILIZER: Roses, crape myrtle, and other plants expected to bloom. Feed azaleas and camellias to aid bud production for next year’s blooms. Fertilize blooming shrubs, including hibiscus and roses. Feed bulbs, including amaryllis and gladiolus, after bloom. Feed citrus and pecan trees. Feed annuals lightly every 2-3 weeks. Feed tropical plants as needed.

PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL: Spray roses weekly; watch for mildew, rust, and other diseases. Check evergreens for bagworms; watch for spider mites as weather warms. Spray webworms. Check lawns for chinch bugs.

WEATHER PROTECTION: Mulch all cultivated beds. Shade young seedlings until established. When watering trees, shrubs, and lawns, soak soil several inches deep; do not water again until plants show signs of water stress. Check lawns for chinch bugs.

POSSIBLE BLOOM: May is the peak season for daylilies, oleander, and magnolia. Many flowers including African daisy, agapanthus, amaranthus, amaryllis, bedding begonia, butterfly weed, cactus, canna, china aster, cleome, cockscomb, crinum, daisy bush, gaillardia, geranium, gladioulus, globe amaranth, gloriosa daisy, impatients, kalanchoe, marigold, shrimp plant, morning star creeper, Moraea iris, moss rose, nasturtium, oxalis, petunia, rose mallow, red yucca, scarlet sage, Shasta daisy, Spuria iris, torenia, verbena, vinca, zinnia. Colorful foilages of bloodleaf, caladium, coleus, copper plant, and croton until frost. Many shrubs, trees, and vines including abelia, beautyberry, blue plumbago, bougainvillea, buddleia, cape honeysuckle, duranta, gardenia, honeysuckle, hydrangea, lantana, ligustrum, pomegranate, retama, shell ginger, Turk’s cap, vitex, yucca, and wild olive.

POSSIBLE HARVEST: Beans, blackberry, cantaloupe, collards, cucumber, eggplant, fig, okra, nectarine, papaya, peach, field peas, peppers, plum, squash, sweet corn, Swiss chard, tomato, and turnip.

GENERAL: Plan for fall bloom. Raise lawn mower blade to highest recommended setting before month ends. To prolong bloom period, keep faded flowers cut.

PRUNE: Cut older canes of oleander, climbing roses, and others which bloom on new growth. Prune azalea, pittosproum, ligustrum, junipers, and other for compact growth. If not done in May, cut poinsettias back to 2 feet from ground and feed. Palms may be pruned. Prune and fertilize blackberries after harvest. Pinch back chrysanthemums.

PLANT: Palms, tropical plants, and caladium tubers; also balled and burlapped and container-grown trees and shrubs.

SEED TO PLANT: Flowers such as alyssum, amaranthus, balsam, cockscomb, coleus, marigold, morning star creeper, moss rose, vinca, and zinnia. Vegetables including okra, field peas, and peppers.

FERTILIZE: Continue feeding annuals. Feed palms and bougainvillea. Dahilas every two weeks after buds appear until bloom. Feed chrysanthemums and hibiscus monthly. Continuously blooming roses can receive a light feeding. Feed amaryllis, caladium, calla, and bulbs including agapanthus as they finish blooming. Last chance to feed pecan trees. Avoid feeding most tropical plants once temperatures regularly reach mid 90s or higher.

PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL: As needed. Spray webworms with Bacillus thuringiensis. Check lawns for grubs; control if needed. Continue checking evergreen shrubs, marigolds, etc. for spider mites.

WEATHER PROTECTION: Mulch cultivated areas. Water deeply when plants start to show water stress.

POSSIBLE BLOOM: Many flowers including agapanthus, amaranthus, bedding begonia, canna, cosmos, crinum, dahlia, daisy bush, daylily, gaillardia, geranium, gladiolus, globe amaranth, glorioso daisy, marguerite daisy, marigold, mealy blue sage, Moraea iris, morning star creeper, moss rose, petunia (fading), rose mallow, scarlet sage, Shasta daisy, shrimp plant, spider lily, sunflower, tithonia, tuberose, verbena, vinca, zinnia. Many trees, shrubs, and vines including abelia, allamanda, althaea, angel trumpet, blue plumbago, bougainvillea, butterfly bush, cape honeysuckle, hydrangea, ixora, lantana, liriope, magnolia, mimosa, oleander, Poinciana, pomegranate, stephanotis, Turk’s cap, trumpet vine, vitex, wild olive.

POSSIBLE HARVEST: Apple, beans, blackberry, fig, cantaloupe, corn, cucumber, okra, onion, papaya, peach, field peas, pepper, plum, pumpkin, squash, tomato, and watermelon.

GENERAL: Continue removing faded flowers of annuals, perennials, and shrubs to prolong bloom. Start gardenia cuttings.

PRUNE: Trim plants as needed for correct size and shape. Cut out dead wood at any time. Pinch back chrysanthemums for the last time. After first bloom of althaea, crape myrtle, and vitex, cut off dead blooms, fertilize, and water well. After flowering, trim back coleus, salvia, sultana, torenia, verbena, and vinca to prolong bloom. In late July prune poinsettias for the last time for December color; if desired root the cuttings in pots. Prune palms as needed.

PLANT: Palms and tropical plants.

SEED TO PLANT: Flowers such as amaranthus, balsam, cockscomb, coleus, marigold, morning star creeper, moss rose, vinca, zinnia. Vegetable seed including cantaloupe, cauliflower, sweet corn, cucumber, eggplant, okra, field peas, pepper, pumpkin, and watermelon. Persistence is needed to keep seed bed moist and seedlings alive after they germinate.

FERTILIZE: Lawns, trees, and shrubs can be lightly fed. Watch for yellowing or whitening of leaves that indicates iron chlorosis, especially in lawns, ligustrum, and tallow trees; correct with a foliar spray of copperas mixed with water, acid-reacting fertilizer, and soil acidifiers. Feed amaryllis, caladiums, hibiscus, and chrysanthemums. Stop feeding azaleas, camellias, and similar acid-soil plants. Continue feeding roses at a reduced rate. Continue feeding blooming annuals once or twice a month.

PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL: Some sprays may damage foliage in summer heat. Read labels carefully. Reduce spray strength to compensate and spray early morning or late afternoon. Watch for chinch bug and grub damage in lawns. Ideal time to control grubs is usually early July. Control whitefly as needed in citrus, Japanese yew, etc. Watch for spider mites and aphids. Control webworms with B.t.

WEATHER PROTECTION: Add mulch to cultivated areas as needed. Water deeply and slowly when ground dries. Use drip irrigation on cultivated areas.

POSSIBLE BLOOM: Many summer annuals and perennials including amaranthus, bedding begonia, bird of paradise, canna, cleome, cockscomb, coleus, cosmos, crinum, daylily, gaillardia, globe amaranth, glorioso daisy, liriope, marguerite daisy, marigold, mealy sage, morning star creeper, moss rose, red yucca, rose mallow, shrimp plant, spider lily, sunflower, tithonia, vinca, and zinnia. Many trees, shrubs, and vines including abelia, allamanda, althaea, bougainvillea, confederate rose, coral vine, crape myrtle, daisy bush, esperanza, gardenia, hibiscus, honeysuckle, ixora, lantana, oleander, plumbago, rose, stephanotis, trumpet vine. Turk’s cap, wild olive.

GENERAL: Start a compost heap using grass clippings, weeds, and tree leaves. Prepare bed for fall vegetable garden. Start cuttings of coleus, geranium, impatiens, etc., for winter house plants. Start air layers of crotons, hibiscus, and other tropical plants to carry through the winter. Plan to purchase spring flowering bulbs as soon as available; order by mail those unavailable locally.

PRUNE: Cut out sucker growth. Prune poinsettias for last time no later than first of month. Last month to prune palms. Cut back leggy geraniums to 12 inches.

PLANT: Container-grown or balled plants, and palm trees. Replant caladiums for fall color. Divide iris.

SEED TO PLANT: Flowers include balsam, cockscomb, cosmos, dianthus, marigold, periwinkle, vinca, and zinnia. Plant pansy seed in seed flats. Vegetables that can be planted in the ground include sweet corn, eggplant, okra, peppers, pumpkin, and tomato. The heat makes it advisable to start cabbage family members, eggplant, peppers and tomatoes in flats for transplanting later. Set out tomatoes late in the day and give some shade for two or three weeks.

FERTILIZE AND MULCH: Amaryllis, caladium, chrysanthemum, hibiscus, iris, roses. As vegetable beds are cleared, dig in manure or compost to prepare for fall planting. Fertilize annuals in bud and bloom. Feed mums every few weeks until buds color. Feed gardenias with an acid-reacting fertilizer. Continue watching for chlorosis in lawns, tallow trees, and acid-soil plants, as treat as needed.

PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL: Chrysanthemums (if needed) and roses. Check shrubs for scale. Control webworms. Watch for speckled leaves which may indicate spider mites on many plants. Treat lawns as needed for chinch bug and grub damage. Spray with emulsifiable summer oil to control whitefly on citrus, Japanese yew, gardenia, etc.

WEATHER PROTECTION: Maintain mulches and water deeply. Continue cutting lawn with mower blade set at highest recommended setting.

POSSIBLE BLOOM: Flowers including amaranthus, asters (including Michaelmas daisy) balsam, bird of paradise, cockscomb, canna, cosmos, crinum, gaillardia, glorioso daisy, lycoris, marigold, mealy blue sage, morning star creeper, moss rose, rose mallow, shrimp plant, sunflower, tithonia, verbena, vinca, zinnia. Many shrubs and vines including abelia, allamanda, althaea, bougainvillea, crape myrtle, duranta. Fireman’s’ cap, esperanza, gardenia, hibiscuas, ixora, lantana, oleander, pampas grass, yellow and blue plumbago, trumpet vine. Turk’s cap, wedelia, wild olive.

POSSIBLE HARVEST: Fig, grapes, okra, papaya, field peas, watermelon.

GENERAL: Remove all plant debris which may harbor insects. Buy spring-blooming bulbs as soon as available. Order bulbs unavailable locally. Refrigerate tulips, hyacinths, and daffodils for at least 6 to 8 weeks before planting. Prepare planting beds for bulbs. Prepare new strawberry beds; transplant new plants or buy new ones.

PESTS AND DISEASES: Treat lawns for chinch bug and grub damage as needed.

PRUNE: Dead stems and branches at any time on all plants. If not done in August, cut geraniums back to 12 inches; if desired plant cuttings for pot plants.

PLANT: Callas and rooted mum and gardenia plants. Divide Easter lilies if crowded. Lift and store glads and caladiums when tops die down.

SEED TO PLANT: Late blooming annuals including African daisy, ageratum, alyssum, amaranthus, anchusa, baby’s breath, bluebonnet, calendula, candytuft, cockscomb, cornflower, cosmos, dianthus (pinks), gaillardia, hollycock, nasturtium, ornamental kale and cabbage, pansy, petunia, poppy, salvia, Shasta daisy, snapdragon, stock, verbena, zinnia. Vegetables including beans, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, corn, cucumbers, dill, eggplant, field peas, mustard, okra, onion, peas, pepper, pumpkin, summer and winter squash. Swiss chard, tomato, and turnip.

FERTILIZE: Fertilize all plants that bloom in the fall. Feed roses, hibiscus, and amaryllis. Feed chrysanthemums every seven to 14 days until buds color. Fertilize ground covers and evergreen shrubs in September or early October.

PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL: Watch for webworms, spider mites, aphids, whitefly, black spot, and mildew. Lawns, if not treated earlier, may need treatment for grubs. Treat lawns troubled by brown patch with a fungicide.

WEATHER PROTECTION: Maintain mulches and water deeply if needed.

POSSIBLE BLOOM: Flowers including amaranthus, bedding begonia, canna, cockscomb, cosmos, daisy bush, gerbera daisy, lycoris, marigold, mealy blue sage, Michaelmas daisy, morning star creeper, moss rose, rose mallow, shrimp plant, tithonia, vinca, zinnia. Trees, shrubs, and vines including bougainvillea, cape honeysuckle, coral vine, Fireman’s cap, esperanza, hibiscus, ixora, pampas grass, Poinciana, ribbon cana, roses, Turk’s cap. Flowers and pods of golden raintree. Berries of beautyberry.

POSSIBLE HARVEST: Banana, corn, cucumber, egg plant, okra, papaya, pear, field peas, pepper squash.

GENERAL: Dig, divie, and replant crowded agapanthus, amaryllis, daylily, Easter lily, flowering onions, iris, and other crowded spring-flowering perennials and bulbs. Separate and replant violets late this month or early in November. Divide and replant liripe, monkey grass, and many hardy ground covers. Start a compost pile. Avoid night time light on Christmas cactus and poinsettia. Start cuttings of tender plants such as begonia, coleus, and impatiens. Plant in pots to add color to patio or for food indoor bloom in winter.

PRUNE: Root-prune wisteria which failed to bloom last spring; add fertilizer in trench; fill with soil, and water deeply.

PLANT: Ideal time to plant hardy trees, shrubs, and roses. Garlic, potatoes, and onion sets. Plant bulbs and roots, including agapanthus, amaryllis, calla, daylily, Dutch iris, Easter lily, flowering onion, gladiolus, ixia, Louisiana iris, oxalis, rain lily, ranuculus, snowflake. Refrigerate bulbs of daffodils for at least 6 weeks before planting in late November or December; refrigerate tulips and hyacinths for at least 8 weeks. Plant a perennial flower border of asters, bulbs, chrysanthemum, daylily, geranium, gerbera daisy, gloriosa daisy, obedient flower, rudbeckia, salvia, Shasta daisy, verbena, vinca minor, violet, yarrow, etc.

SEED TO PLANT: Flowers and hardy annuals including African daisy, ageratum, alyssum, baby’s breath, basket of gold, bells-of-Ireland, bluebonnet, calendula, candytuft, carnation, coreopsis, cornflower, daisy dianthus (pinks), forget-me-not, gaillardia, hollyhock, larkspur, liatris, nasturtium, ornamental kale and cabbage, pansy, petunia, phlox, poppy, salvia, snapdragon, stock, and sweet pea. Vegetables including asparagus (roots and seed), beans, beets, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, collards, dill, endive, garlic, kale, kohlrabi, leek, lettuce, mustard, onion, Oriental greens, parsley, peas, potato, radish, spinach (late October), squash, Swiss chard, and turnip.

FERTILIZE: Chrysanthemums, poinsettias. Feed daylily and wisteria with high phosphorus fertilizer. Fertilize lawn in late October or early November with manure or slow-release chemical fertilizer. Tropical plants may be given a high potassium fertilizer to help harden them off for the winter. Feed established cold hardy bulbs such as iris, crinum, allium.

PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL: As needed for fall caterpillars.

POSSIBLE BLOOM: Flowers including cosmos, chrysanthemum, cockscomb, daisy bush, Michaelmas daisy, gerbera daisy, lycoris, marigold, morning star creeper, moss rose, rose mallow, shrimp plant, vinca, zinnia. Trees, shrubs, and vines including bougainvillea, coral vine, emperor’s candlestick, esperanza, hibiscus, kapok tree, pampas grass, plumbago, roses, Turk’s cap. Berries of beautyberry, chinaberry, duranta, and pyracantha; seed pods of golden rain tree.

POSSIBLE HARVEST: Banana, beans, cantaloupe, corn, eggplant, okra, field peas, papaya, pear, pecan, pepper, persimmon, pumpkin, radish, tomato, and watermelon.

PLAN: Winter protection of tender plants; assemble needed materials.

GENERAL: Collect tree leaves for mulch or compost. Divide and replant crowded perennials if not done in October. Prepare new rose beds for planting bare-root plants in January or February; container-grown plants until April. Clean, oil, and sharpen tools.

PRUNE: Flowering perennials that have finished blooming. Compost or remove all dead foliage.

PLANT: Best time to plant cold hardy container-grown trees, shrubs, and vines. Wait until January to plant bareroot plants. Plant onion sets and garlic. Transplant pansies to beds and feed often. Plant prechilled tulips, hyacinths, and daffodils from the end of November through December. Plant most spring blooming bulbs which require no chilling; in addition to October list, plant anemones. Set out carnations, daylilies, roses, and others. If no winter vegetable garden is planned, plant a cover crop of cereal rye in garden area.

SEED TO PLANT: Cool weather annuals including alyssum, anchusa, baby’s breath, basket of gold, bells-of-Ireland, bluebonnet, calendula, candytuft, carnation, cornflower, daisy (African and Shasta), delphinium, dianthus, gaillardia, hollyhock, larkspur, nasturtium, ornamental kale and cabbage, pansy, petunia, phlox, pinks, poppy, snapdragon, stock, sweet pea (by mid November), verbena, viola. Vegetables, including asparagus, beets, broccoli, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, collards, dill, endive, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, mustard, onion. Oriental greens, parsley, peas, radish, spinach, Swiss chard, turnip.

FERTILIZE: Sweet pea, pansy, and amaryllis. Fertilize bulbs as soon as new growth appears. Feed lawn and daylilies unless done in October. Avoid feeding tropical plants. Feed daylilies with high phosphorus fertilizer if not done in October.

WEATHER PROTECTION: By mid month, move tender container plants to sheltered area. When a freeze is predicted, mulch tender plants with leaves, grass clippings, hay. Bank soil around bases of tender trees and shrubs, or wrap trunks. Cover all smaller tender plants. Water deeply before a freeze if ground is dry.

POSSIBLE BLOOM: Flowers including alyssum, beding begonias, calendula, candytuft, chrysanthemum, cockscomb, cosmos, Michaelmas daisy, marigold, petunia, shrimp plant, verbena, vinca, zinnia. Trees, shrubs, and vines such as bougainvillea, hibiscus, lantana, loquat, plumbago, pointsettia, roses, Turk’s cap. Berries of beautyberry, nandina, pyracantha, and yaupon.

POSSIBLE HARVEST: Banana, beans, cabbage, cantaloupe, cauliflower, collards, citrus fruits, cucumber, eggplant, endive, kale, kohlrabi, papaya, parsley, pecan, pepper, radish, spinach, squash, Swiss chard, turnip, tomato, watermelon.

PLAN: For cold weather protection. Collect mulch material, boxes, tarps, plastic, old sheets as covers. Get insulating wrap for tender trees such as citrus.

PRUNE: Cut back mums, other perennials that have finished blooming. Keep sweet pea and pansy blooms picked to prolong bloom period.

PLANT: Dormant trees, shrubs, vines, and roses. Spring flowering bulbs including anemone, gladiolus, ixia, rain lily, ranuculus, and snowflake; also plant pre-chilled daffodil, freesia, grape hyacinth, hyacinth, tulip.

SEED TO PLANT: Flowers including carnation, cornflower, larkspur, nasturtium, petunia, poppy, snapdragon, verbena. Vegetables, including beets, all of the cabbage clan, carrots, lettuce, mustard, onions, peas, radish, spinach, chard, turnip.

FERTILIZE: Sweet pea and pansy; spring-flowering bulbs (except amaryllis) as new growth appears.

PEST AND DISEASE CONTROL: Spray dormant (leafless) trees and shrubs with dormant oil to control scale.

WEATHER PROTECTION: Water as needed in dry weather. Be prepared to move container plants and cover others when freeze is forecast.

POSSIBLE BLOOM: Alyssum, bedding begonia, calendula, chrysanthemum, dianthus, ornamental kale and cabbage, pansy, paperwhite narcissus, poinsettia, rose, scarlet sage, sweet pea, Turk’s cap, verbena, violet. Berries of Burford holly, nandina, pyracantha, yaupon.

POSSIBLE HARVEST: Broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrot, cauliflower, chard, citrus, eggplant, endive, kale, kohlrabi, lettuce, mustard, onion, papaya, parsley, garden peas, radish, spinach, tomato, turnip.

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